Album Reviews (28)

SeepeopleS announce the release of Love, the first in a three-part EP series

SeepeopleS, the original anti-genre indie musical pranksters, are releasing a new studio album on Sept. 6. The EP, titled Love is the first of three in the Love, Hate, Live series of releases planned for the coming year. SeepeopleS has been gaining an underground army of loyal fans since the band’s inception in Boston back in 2000. Music lovers have celebrated the group’s previous five albums, many of which feature musical contributions from members of…

Edwards and friends: Folk veteran receives assist with Tomorrow's Child

My introduction to Jonathan Edwards came courtesy of Paul Westerberg thanks to a cover of the former’s classic, “Sunshine,” on the soundtrack to the hit television series, Friends. Like most 10-year-olds hanging out in northern Maine, I was listening to the cassettes that I had in my possession from front to back, seeking out the hidden gems buried within that were unlikely to make it to radio. Westerberg’s version of “Sunshine” sounded familiar (likely due…

Revelations from Dominic and The Lucid: FERRET explores countless avenues

It has been five years since the last Dominic and The Lucid LP.   In the time between The Lucid and their new record, FERRET, singer/guitarist/songwriter/leader Dominic Lavoie got married and welcomed a daughter. He also recorded a solo album and became the ringleader for a seven-piece band, both called ShaShaSha. Meanwhile, D&TL put out just one song, 2014’s moody “Late Night at The Circus”. As Exposé once sang, “Seasons change / People change,” and based purely on…

Into an uncertain future with Old Etc.: Biddeford-based band releases tantalizing album

Bands break up all the time. Local and regional acts tend to do so more often and less ceremoniously. Rarely does an unsigned group, still making their rounds at bars, clubs and DIY shows, get the chance to know that the end is coming with enough of an advance to send themselves off properly. Old Etc., a Biddeford-based rock quartet, have, in under two years, gone from playing their first live shows to becoming a…

Deep end of the pool: Purse dives into layers of sound in adventurous outing

Put It In The Pool, the latest release from the Ginette Labonville-fronted trio, Purse, is a noisy, sludgy, idea-stuffed affair that makes the best use of its production decisions, sequencing and area travelled within each track. Though technical errors exist throughout (some by choice), something has been captured in these performances, and the way they have been layered, that goes beyond getting it “right.” “Hot Swap” kicks things off with a tinny-sounding band playing a…

An Evening With challenges, confounds with hook-heavy outing

Arriving almost eight years after their last release, Lovers and Losers, the new self-titled record by An Evening With is a satisfying and confounding listen. A warmer, fuller sound with less obvious country leanings make up most of this album’s tracklist, which also includes some giant left turns with surprising payoffs. Though singer/guitarist Jeremy Alexander’s vocal range is limited, his delivery of smart lyrics fits these songs and their sonically pleasing arrangements. Tom Rogers’ drumming…

Power and push: Bully Mammoth challenges listeners, perfects brutal sound

It would only make sense that next week’s Secret Show at Central Gallery in Bangor, a spot frequented by more and more Portland acts (and for good reason), would feature one of our city’s best-kept secrets. Since their live debut at the Damnationland Soundtrack Release Party late last year, Bully Mammoth has been aggravating and pummeling confused audience members with their utterly unsympathetic brand of noise and distress. Their music is not nice nor catchy…

Fenimore's inscrutable debut: James Paul Cooper confounds, dazzles with instrumental outing

どこかで空間と時間の間 :: 我々はすべての落下します, the debut record from Fenimore, the latest project from James Paul Cooper (Conjjjecture), is a spacy instrumental affair with a surprising amount of human presence for an electronic work. The cover art for the record is a fittingly garish, clip-art concoction featuring stars, a hand offering up a palm tree and Japanese text. The title (which translates to Somewhere Between Time and Space, We All Fall Down) and song names are also…

Sit-down crowd favorites: Max Ater & The Marshalls burst onto the adult-alt scene

A fairly new trio from the Bath area, Max Ater & The Marshalls have successfully started to make waves in their hometown and are hoping to extend their reach with a few shows in Portland in the coming weeks and festival gigs throughout the summer. Having just recently won the Young & Free Maine Sound Off Competition, they’ve also scored a spot for the Old Port Festival as well as some recording time in Bangor.…

Beam me up? Jeff Beam defies labels

Is it possible that Jeff Beam is an alien? Or perhaps a time traveler? It doesn’t seem to make sense that in the 21st century there could be somebody who operates without an ounce of concern as to what is going on in any current musical environment. The man has his musical touchstones, and his beliefs, and he creates, and has been creating, for years. He is an artist with no apologies, staying true to…
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