Britta Konau

Britta Konau

Solid and obvious: Todd Webb’s firmly grounded vision

art_webbphotosBK_091715Solid and obvious, maybe even a little predictable — that seems to describe the majority of the 25 gelatin silver prints by Todd Webb (1905–2005) on view at University of Southern Maine’s Woodbury Campus Center. Part of this year’s Maine Photo Project, the images are from the 1940s–1980s, focus on New York, Paris and New Mexico, and are drawn from the USM Art Department and Galleries collection.

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Similar beginnings, very different ends: Amparo Carvajal-Hufschmid and Claire Seidl at ICON

_DSC8666ICON Contemporary Art’s pairing of works on paper and Mylar by Amparo Carvajal-Hufschmid and Claire Seidl highlights parallels and differences. Seidl, who is also a painter and photographer, divides her time between New York and Rangeley, and Hufschmid lives in Alton, N.H. In both artists’ work, art developments from the past resurface, as happens a lot these days. Minimalism for Hufschmid, abstract expressionism for Seidl. Both use layering as a pictorial strategy and both start their process with printmaking.

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Getting physical: Foregrounding the material nature of art

ÔInnessÕ Oil on canvas, 42 x 35 in., 2015, by Timothy Wilson.Ambling through the Corey Daniels Gallery in Wells feels like a treasure hunt. Antiques are freely mixed with artwork small and large, and the odd object, like a trio of brightly colored juggling balls, accentuate the highly individualistic and tightly curated selection. Wanting to only see one of the temporary shows therefore becomes something of an obstacle race in which one has to continuously fight distraction. But then again, those “distractions” are what constitutes this place and makes it feel alive and not just a hushed showroom for contemporary art.

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What we don’t see: Anna Hepler and the blind spot of creativity

art_BlindSpot.exhibition.view mike flemingBK_080615Anna Hepler’s show at the University of Maine Museum of Art in Bangor is aptly titled “Blind Spot.” But more about that later. It takes up only about a third of the museum’s largest gallery, however, with over 50 individual works in a great range of media, techniques, and scale it could easily have taken over twice the allotted space. Especially since the show features some of the strongest work Hepler has created so far and every one of the pieces packs a punch. The artist-made pedestals and display furniture made from large blocks of wood, metal pipes, and concrete add significantly to that impact.

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Exploring new terrain: Cynthia Davis and Ronnie Wilson don’t rest

Art_3-Fish GalleryBK_061115Some artists stick with their medium, style and subject, for a long time. Others repeatedly make about-turns into new directions. Still others keep pursuing specific lines of inquiry, going deeper and farther, continually exploring. Cynthia Davis belongs to the latter group of artists, Ronnie Wilson seemingly to the about-turns, but not quite. Both artists show recent work in “Of Breath and Bone” at Portland’s 3-Fish Gallery.

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Ink, press, repeat: Intriguing monoprints at PhoPa Gallery

At PhoPa Gallery, its “Pa” side is currently being explored with monoprints by Karen Adrienne, Kris Sader and Barbra Whitten. Their works on paper share layering and repetition of process, as well as a degree of liquidity, which explains the show’s title, Ripple Effect.

There’s a calm, almost soothing palette to the entire gallery, and all artists evidence a great sense of color. In its exclusive focus on monoprints (unique works on paper that are made using ink and a printing surface), the show intrinsically foregrounds process. However, Adrienne, Sader and Whitten go further to make process integral to their works’ essence — and that’s also where the work diverges.

  • Published in Art
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